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Xbox Interested in PlayStation’s DualSense’s Technology

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According to reports, Xbox‘s marketing team is surveying customers about DualSense and the Series X|S controller. A specific question is looking to gather information on whether if Xbox should integrate adaptive triggers and twin motors to produce a similar haptic feedback experience.

Following the technical reveal of the PlayStation 5, the head of Xbox, Phil Spencer admitted that he was surprised by the competitor’s SSD, however, he did not mention anything about the revolutionary DualSense controller.

It looks like Microsoft could be designing a new Elite controller, is possible that the results of the survey could influence the engineers and designers decision at team Xbox, and the new controller could integrate a touchpad, haptic feedback, or adaptive triggers.

Microsoft designed the Series X to crush the PlayStation 5 in overall performance, but the price of the console must be much higher than its Japanese counterpart. Certainly, selling a next-gen console at a bargain price means that some compromises were made, Phil Spencer’s team decided to stick with the basics of the previous-gen controller.

The controller shipped with the Series X|S introduced new features like a dedicated share button, a precise D-Pad, and a much appreciated textured grip.

Interestingly, Xbox filed a patent in 2019 in which they register its own design for adaptive triggers, take a look at the images down below:

Such a motor-driven, force-feedback trigger configuration enables the user-perceived state of the trigger to be dynamically adjusted in a variety of ways. For example, the trigger may be driven by the force-feedback motor to adjust a user-perceived resistance of the user-actuatable trigger.

In another example, the trigger may be driven by the force-feedback motor to simulate a hard stop that effectively adjusts a pull length or range of rotation of the trigger.

In another example, the trigger may be driven by the force-feedback motor to assist the trigger in returning to a fully-extended or “unpressed” posture when a user’s finger is removed from the trigger. In another example, the trigger may be driven by the force-feedback motor to vibrate the trigger.

Source: GamespotRuheight

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